New England Wildlife Centers

newc green building

Wildlife Hospital

The Center treats and cares for 225 different species of animals each year. Over the years we have treated over 75,000 wild animals.   This includes sick, injured and orphaned native and naturalized wild animals such as hummingbirds, snapping turtles, raccoons, foxes, cottontails, hawks, owls and many others.  The care is conducted under the direction of veterinarians.  The vet team includes wildlife rehabilitators, veterinary technicians and animal care workers.  High school and undergraduate interns are incorporated into the day-to-day care, giving students the opportunity to work with and study up-close the biology of many species.  These are animals that students would otherwise never have the opportunity to contact. The care provided to wildlife succeeds about one-half of the time.  By the time wild animals that are sick or injured are able to be successfully caught and brought to us, they are usually in very poor condition.  All animals successfully rehabilitated are released back to local woodlands and estuaries.

Hospital Admission Hours

We admit sick, injured and orphaned wildlife at the NEWC Wildlife Hospital, located at 500 Columbian Street in South Weymouth:

Monday through Friday
10:00 am – 12:00 pm

PLEASE CALL AHEAD! 781.682.4878 

Please call BEFORE bringing a wild animal or bird to the hospital to make sure we are able to help you.

Spring and summer are the busiest times of year for our wildlife hospital!

Because there are so many wild babies and other wildlife in need of medical care, our “beds” fill up quickly.  When the hospital is full, we cannot admit new wild patients until we have room available to provide care.

This policy ensures that all of our patients are given the highest quality veterinary treatment and care.

Everyone at the Center is dedicated to protecting wildlife.

You can find additional resources to turn to for help with orphaned, sick, and injured wildlife by visiting: mass.gov/eea/agencies/dfg/dfw/fish-wildlife-plants/wildlife-rehabilitation.html


Jack BanagisWildlife Hospital